Meat Part 4 – What Makes Meat Lean and Tender?

Note: This is a loose transcription of the video, ‘Meat Part 4 – What Makes Meat Lean and Tender?’

Bex: Andrew, I’ve learned a lot about meat from you, in my time shopping here. The one thing, that you have talked about is how aging makes the meat very tender, especially grass fed meat; which tends to be tough.

Andrew: Yes it can be a little tougher…

Bex: Tell me more about the aging process. Is it long or short? Do all butchers do that?

What makes meat lean and tender?

[nonmember]FREE YOU TUBE VIDEO – Duration: 1:47min


MEMBER VIDEO: Duration: 6:30min

View the entire member video below when logged in.
No login details? Join the Tribe! (top right of this page)
[/nonmember]
[wlm_loginform]
[private_FREE]
[jwplayer config=”primal-health-600w-player” mediaid=”5062″]
[/private_FREE]

Andrew: Not all butchers do that. All butchers used to do that. In certain western countries, the health and safety departments have tried to stop aging, which has led to a lot of consumption of tough meat, because aging is very important to allow all the fibres in the meat just to relax and all the microbes to go to work and  tenderise the meat. The reason why we age our meat here, is because grass-fed lacks a little bit of a marbling that you will get from grain-fed meat, so in its natural state it is a little a bit tougher than its grain-fed equivalent, so in order to combat that here in Brookvale meats, we buy yearling grade meat, which is young, therefore tender and we also just hang it for 7 to 10 days. So we cut the body up, and we hang the ‘primals’ which are all the T-bones, and the Sirloins, and the Yorks and the Rumps  – we hang those for 7 to 10 days. Just so nature can go to work on it, just tenderise it a little bit.

What makes meat lean and tender?
Andrew explains to Bex what makes meat lean and tender

Now, the aging process can go on for months and months, if you got the correct microbial environment. We haven’t invested in the thousands and thousands of dollars you would need for special cool rooms to age your meat for three months. That’s NOT what we do here. We are aging our meat specifically to try and tenderise it a little bit, so grass-fed meat which is inherently tougher than grain-fed can be as soft and tender as the grain-fed equivalent, if you buy it from here.

Bex: That would explain a lot about why grass-fed meat would be better than grain-fed meat for people who are concerned about their health and weight loss and fat consumption, because, what you’re saying is that the grass-fed meat is tougher because it has less fat?

Andrew: It’s only slightly tougher. Because it has less fat in it. It’s less marbling, which is that grainy texture running through the meat of the steak, which chefs in restaurants prize.

But the health benefits of grass-fed meat is well-documented, well, well-documented. Search the internet. You’ll immediately see there are many benefits of grass-fed over grain-fed. The benefits to your heart, your brain, some of the essential acids that your body needs to operate healthily…much,much higher levels in grass-fed meat. So, why would you want to eat grain-fed meat? Why?

Bex: Exactly!

Andrew: Why bother, when it’s (grass-fed) healthier to eat. Grass-fed, it is a misconception that it’s more expensive. I mean if you go the cheapest butcher in town, we (Brookvale Meats) will be a tiny bit more expensive. But we’re talking about pennies, cents. We’re not talking about large differences in prices, only very little fractions. Yeah, the animals have done lots of wandering around the paddock, and had a full life. If that’s not worth paying an extra 3 or 4 percent for, then I don’t know what is.

Bex: I couldn’t have said it better.

Andrew (in reference to their cuts in a fridge): Okay, here at Brookvale Meats, we buy in whole carcasses direct from farms and then we bring them in and we break them down. Boris here has worked with us for nearly 40 years so he knows a few things about breaking down animal carcasses. Now, one of Boris’ jobs is to break down the whole body into what are called the ‘primals’ and the primals are different, aren’t they Boris? So what do you have there?

Borris: Sirloin Steaks.

Andrew: Sirloin Steaks, also know as a New York cut. Porterhouse?

Borris: Same thing. It’s all the same.

Andrew: So the T-bone, on one end has the Porterhouse going through it and sometimes the T-bone has the eye fillet on the other end.  In here (pointing to the fridge), the carcasses are de-boned, the primals are hung up to age  for about a week to 10 days trying to tenderise them. That’s how it’s done!

Bex: Just to conclude, is there anything else that you would recommend that consumers ask a butcher, when they’re looking for a butcher with good quality meat.

Andrew: I think it’s not a question of asking the butcher necessarily,  it’s just a question of getting to know your butcher. Whether it’s Brookvale Meats or any other reputable butchers, there are plenty of decent butchers on the Northern Beaches (and the world!). It’s a question of getting to know your butchers, so that you can find out: where it’s coming from, what it’s been eating, what are you putting on the table, recommendations, what’s good this week?  My daughter can’t eat fats, so what cuts are better? My son is allergic is to nitrates, have you got any ham or bacon that hasn’t got nitrates? It is just the question of getting to know your butcher, to allow your butcher to do what he wants to do, just help you buy what you need.

Bex: Fantastic.

Andrew: Just develop a relationship with your butcher, wherever it is.

Bex: Fantastic.

Bex: Well, thank you so much for taking the time today to explain that to us…

Andrew: Thank you so much for giving the opportunity to.

Bex: …so that we can make better choices about food.

 

Other videos in this series:

Meat Part 1 – You CAN Afford Grass Fed Meat!
Meat Part 2 – Do You Know Where Your Meat Comes From?
Meat Part 3 – What is Free Range, Grass Fed, Organic Meat?

Meat Part 3 – What is Free Range, Grass Fed, Organic Meat?

What is Free Range, Grass Fed, Organic Meat?

Note: This is a loose transcription of the video, ‘Meat Part 3 – What is Free Range, Grass Fed, Organic Meat?’

Bex: So, you’re painting a very detailed picture for us here – the two ways we can have our animals treated, produced and sold before they come to our table. And so for the consumer who is looking for a butcher they want to buy from and they’re seeing all these labels, is there actually any difference between grass-fed and pasture-fed?

Andrew: No, it’s essentially the same thing.

Bex: And free-range vs. free roaming? Is it just terminology?

What is Free Range, Grass Fed, Organic Meat?

[nonmember]FREE YOU TUBE VIDEO – Duration: 1:57min

MEMBER VIDEO: Duration: 4.41min
View the entire member video below when logged in.
No login details? Join the Tribe! (top right of this page)
[/nonmember]
[wlm_loginform]
[private_FREE]
[jwplayer config=”primal-health-600w-player” mediaid=”4995″]
[/private_FREE]

Andrew: Depends on the type of meat. Free range to me, it means for the sheep it’s just out in the bush and for a cow it’s in the paddock eating grass. For a chicken, it means that it has access to the outdoors; it can go outdoors if it wishes to. Although true free-range, a very true free-range poultry farm, is where the chickens are out all the time. So, free-range and free-roaming just have a little bit different definition, depending on where they are from and also what type of meat. For example, pork has a strict definition of free-range now, and that’s a little bit restrictive on the grower, because growers who were previously accredited as free-range are now struggling to gain free-range accreditation. I feel sorry for them because their pigs are bred and grown in a very animal-friendly way; it’s just that they’re not strictly known as free-range. Even RSPCA accredited piggeries in Australia are not technically free-range, which is absurd because the RSPCA think very highly of those piggeries, and yet for some strange reason the accreditation board don’t allow it. So free-range, free-roaming has to be interpreted in a little bit of that context, and also depends on which type of meat.

Bex: And speaking of accreditation, what about meat that is labelled organic, how does that differ at all from the other meats?

Learn the importance of meat labels such as pasture fed
Learn the importance of meat labels such as pasture fed

Andrew: Organic is a different category. We don’t promote organic meat here necessarily as it would involve too much segregation of meats here. I prefer just free-range. Free-range to me is natural and organic, while some grain-fed (animals) might be fed with organic grain and called organic. I think some of these small boutique organic growers are fantastic, but I am not too sure about the validity of the mass-procured organic brands.

Bex: So when it comes to meat, grass-fed is a better first indicator than organic.

Andrew: For me, personally, it is. You can’t get better than a natural diet (for the animals). Simple as that.

Bex: Thank you. And is there an exception to the rule? Because I know for example you hear about Wagyu beef, and Wagyu beef is known as grain-fed cow. Tell us more about Wagyu.

Andrew: Wagyu is the exception to the rule, if you’re going to sell Wagyu then you should sell it for the glory of the meat. The meat comes from the Kobi breed. It is known to be a breed of cattle which is able to send the fat from the surface of the skin to get into the muscle, there by creating this marbling effect. So Wagyu is different. Our Wagyu spends a year a part in the field and then spends a year in the feedlot eating grain, but the grain has no antibiotics in it and it’s also just vegetable grain. Yeah, that’s the only grain-fed meat we sell here.

 

Other videos in this series:

Meat Part 1 – You CAN Afford Grass Fed Meat!
Meat Part 2 – Do You Know Where Your Meat Comes From?
Meat Part 4 – What makes meat lean and tender?

Meat Part 2 – Do You Know Where Your Meat Comes From?

Do You Know Where Your Meat Comes From?

Note: This is a loose transcription of the video, ‘Meat Part 2 – Do you know where your meat comes from?’

Bex: So when we’re talking about the quality of meat, you were mentioning to me before the concept of provenance. What does that mean?

Andrew: Provenance is a very very important concept here. Provenance, it just basically means, where things come from.

Do you know where your meat comes from?

[nonmember]FREE YOU TUBE VIDEO – Duration: 1:39min


MEMBER VIDEO: Duration: 3.50min
View the entire member video below when logged in.
No login details? Join the Tribe! (top right of this page)
[/nonmember]
[wlm_loginform]
[private_FREE]
[jwplayer config=”primal-health-600w-player” mediaid=”4878″]
[/private_FREE]

Andrew: And for me that means, not just where the animals come from, but what they have been eating, and who’s been looking after, and how did they get here and how did we treat the animal once it’s here? So, for us provenance means trying to source locally and trying to support your local small produce. Also, trying to work out which are the farms which are producing decent, grass-fed meat in a trustworthy fashion. Very important again to know the people that are growing your meat.

So because of the importance of sourcing locally and sourcing from decent land, we try to source most of our beef and lamb, and some of our pork, from Cowra, NSW, which is a location that is abundant in water (Southern Highlands of NSW). I think it is in the confluence of two rivers. Which means, it’s got some of the best pasture grazing land in Australia and in turn means, that the cattle and sheep grazing upon that land are gonna be eating good food. So, if they’re eating good food then by sheer definition, if you’re eating them then you’re eating good quality beef, good quality lamb made from local producers.

Pasture fed meat vs factory farmed meat

Andrew: So the idea of provenance, it encompasses not just where it comes from, who’s growing it, but also the the other tenant of provenance is how’s the animal being look after? Has it been let loose, to roam freely in pasture? And it must not have been fed with grains, that are often laced with antibiotics. For us, that’s a no-no. We just want a naturally-grown animal. Now, the reason why there’s been such a use of antibiotics, in the recent times is that the market wants lean meat, and  antibiotics provide quick growth of the meat. The cow is growing quickly, growing muscles because it’s overloading on hormones and it’s making the meat that the supermarket or the mass producer wants. It wants a lean, quickly-grown animal which you get if you feed the animal antibiotics and/or growth hormones.

Obviously, it’s going to grow very quickly and that’s good for the grower, it means they’re going to get faster stock returns. But for us, no, these hormones are insidious. They often go in from a little patch on the hair, so they are drip-fed hormones. It’s 24-7 in the animal or in the feeds, but either way it’s not something which we support or promote or wish to be doing. We just want our customers to eat natural meat.

 

Do you know where your meat comes from?

 

Meat Part 1 – You CAN Afford Grass Fed Meat!

You Can Afford Grass Fed Meat

Note: This is a loose transcription of the video, ‘Meat Part 1 – You CAN Afford Grass Fed Meat!’

Bex:
Hi, we are here with Andrew Lupton at Brookvale meats in Sydney, where we have been buying our meat for quite some time and recommending to everyone we can. The main reason that we buy and we recommend the meat here, is that it is grass-fed, sourced from local farms, antibiotic and hormone-free. The meat is coming from animals that are raised well. Animals that are healthy, and that’s going to make us healthy. However, Andrew, lots of people are concerned that they can’t afford grass-fed, free-range meat. What would you say to customers about this concern?

You CAN Afford Grass Fed Meat!

[nonmember]FREE YOU TUBE VIDEO – Duration: 1:38min


MEMBER VIDEO: Duration: 5.40min

View the entire member video below when logged in.
No login details? Join the Tribe! (top right of this page)
[/nonmember]
[wlm_loginform]
[private_FREE]
[jwplayer config=”primal-health-600w-player” mediaid=”4804″]
[/private_FREE]

Andrew: I’d recommend they all come down here and have a look at the prices!

Bex: That will do it!!

Andrew: As simple as that.

Brookvale Meats - Free Range Grass Fed Meat

Andrew:
They’ll find the difference here. One lady customer was told by her husband not to shop here, because we’re very expensive. So, she went out and compared like for like in one of our well-known supermarkets around the corner, and we were 50 percent cheaper. So, let’s dismiss that myth, there’s no penalty for buying grass-fed meat. No, on the contrary, you can buy grass-fed rump meat, a whole grass-fed rump for $12/kg. That’s cheap meat. So, no it’s not more expensive and you don’t have to pay that.

Bex:
Do you think a lot of that might come  from the fact that people are used to only a few popular cuts of meat, and that those cuts might be the most expensive cuts?

Andrew:
It certainly could be possible, that could be a reason. I think perhaps more likely is that people are used to markets, where they buy similar meat, free-range meat from boutique producers, who because of the size of their operations, they have to charge a lot  more than we do (Brookvale Meats), and so here comes the perception, from perhaps buying free-range meat from markets and boutique suppliers, that it’s very expensive. It’s entirely a bit more expensive but it’s a very, very small price to pay at this point.

Bex:
Absolutely, and another thing that  might be able to help consumers in budgeting their meat purchases, is buying in bulk. How does that work and what are the best cuts for bulk purchase?

Andrew:
Well, I suppose the best cut for a bulk purchase, is to buy a whole cow! Indeed, it’s something that we do. We cut it up for them and they come in their ute (pick-up truck), and they take it away. So, people do buy whole pigs, they buy whole lambs, they do buy half cows. So, there are some people out there that buy in bulk.

Bex: Smaller families?

Andrew:
Smaller families, smaller freezers. Buying in bulk it is important but it’s not necessary, you just need to buy the cheaper cuts. If you want to reduce the expenses, then talk to your butcher. What do I do with a beef blade, how can I cut it? How can I cook it?

Bex: Exactly.

Andrew:
These are the things that you should be asking the butcher to try to reduce  the weekly spend. A lot of that is on our website, there’s a whole section of cheaper cuts and loads of recipes involved within the website on cheaper cuts. To me, it’s not necessary to fill your deep freezer to save a few bucks.

Bex: So, can you list off a few of these cheaper, less popular, lesser known cuts that you recommend?

Andrew:
Gosh, where to start? Okay, pigs trotters! They cost next to nothing. We give them away! They’re not for the faint-hearted indeed. You have to like your dose of fat, but it’s extremely cheap. The cheaper cuts would be anything that is a little bit tougher to cook that doesn’t cook quickly. Lamb shanks, lamb neck… lamb neck makes the best stew, it has the most flavour and when you cook it right it is a tender meat. I love it! I prefer it to loin chops which are three times the price. On beef, we’re talking about Osso Bucco, we’re talking about the shoulder, and the leg; these are the cheaper cuts. They do indeed involve longer cooking periods , most of the time, although we can tenderise it for you. We can get you a shoulder or leg and cut it nice and thin, bash it and tenderise it, and still be treated like a steak.

Bex:
Beautiful, and as you mentioned you have a wonderful page. A couple of pages on the website talking about cheaper cuts. Where they are all listed out with pictures and everything.

Andrew: There’s a few recipes too, I try to encourage people…

Bex:
Great recipes, and your website is, www.brookvalemeats.com.au. Have a look there and learn about the cheaper cuts, and realise that you’re going to get a lot of bang for your buck and you’re not going to have to spend more than you want to. It’s really about choosing quality food. Thank you, Andrew.

Andrew: Thanks for your time!

 

Do you cook with cheaper cuts of meat? What are your favourites?

 

Cheap Organic Fruits and Vegetables Grown in The City

Note:  ‘Are Freerange Organic Eggs Worth the Money?’ – This is a transcription of the video.

Bex:
Hello, we are here with Vince Polito in Cromer, Sydney in the middle of the suburbs right across the street from an elementary school and right next to another house and another house; a typical suburb. However, if you can see behind us, we have got a farm in the middle of a suburb. We are here with Vince today to talk about how we can get wonderful farm fresh vegetables from his family to ours.

Hi Vince! Can you tell us how much space you have here growing these beautiful organic vegetables and how long you have this farm going?

Vince:
It’s just a large block of land for the moment. We had a lot of land that we don’t have any more.

Bex:
How long you have been running this backyard farm?

Vince:
From 1968, we had the shop and farm. We grew spinach, all greens, tomatoes and we supported ourselves with a shop. There’s four in my family, 2 boys, me and the wife.

[nonmember]FREE YOU TUBE VIDEO – Duration: 2:21min


MEMBER VIDEO: Duration: 10.01min

View the entire member video below when logged in.
No login details? Join the Tribe! (top right of this page)
[/nonmember]
[wlm_loginform]
[private_FREE]
[jwplayer config=”primal-health-600w-player” mediaid=”4117″]
[/private_FREE]

Bex:
Wonderful, and how much space do we have here that you are growing all the crops?

Vince:
Roughly 200m2 (2150ft).

Bex:
About two house blocks?

Vince:
Yeah, roughly. One block I have to let it go now and I concentrate on the one as I’m getting old! I am 83.

Cheap Organic Fruits and Vegetables Grown in Your-city City
Vince’s backyard!

Bex:
He’s 83! How long have you been growing in your backyard farm?

Vince:
57 years. All veggies, spinach, tomatoes, pumpkin, carrots, beetroot and everything! When we had the shop.

Bex:
What do you have currently growing here?

Vince:
For the moment, we have corn and tomatoes.

Bex:
Corn and tomatoes. I see a very large tomato crop.

Vince:
Yes. 600 plants.

Bex:
600 tomato plants! How long have they been growing and when will they be finished?

Vince:
At the end of January, they should be finished. All depends on the weather. For a couple of months, we’ll pick them if the crop is doing well.

Bex:
You’ve said that you have a lot of corn right now?

Vince:
Yes, I have corn till May.

Bex:
So, you grow them seasonally?

Vince:
Yes, Yes.

Bex:
What else do you have growing in here at the moment?

Vince:
That’s all I have for the moment.

Bex:
For selling at the farmer’s market?

Vince:
Yes.

Bex:
What else do you have here that you grow for your family?

Vince:
I grow lettuce, little carrots, spinach and all that stuff.

Bex:
I noticed you have some chili peppers and some herbs – Basil, rosemary?

Vince:
Basil, oregano, mint. We had a lot of rhubarb but that’s finished now.

Bex:
Ok. I saw some bean plants?

Vince:
I plant beans for the family, 2 or 3 rows every year.

Bex:
Italians eat lots of Borlotti beans…

Vince:
One finish, one start…

Bex:
I saw some chickens in the back?

Vince:
I’ve got 11 chickens and 5 or 6 eggs every day.

Bex:
5 or 6 eggs every day?

Vince:
Yeah!

Bex:
Beautiful!

Vince:
I have 2 bee hives, about 100 kg (220 lb) of honey every year.

Bex:
Honey bees, how much per year?

Vince:
100kg. This is for the family and not for business.

Bex:
Around the perimeter of the house, I have seen lots of avocado trees.

Vince:
I’ve got a lot of avocados. About  a dozen plants. They are all full of fruit.

Bex:
Do you have a lot of fruit from them?

Vince:
Yes, I do. Every second year.  Not every year.

Bex:
Ah, I see.

Vince:
Every second year. They do one year and they have a spell for another year.

Bex:
There is a kiwi vine growing up on the side of the house?

Vince:
Just more for show and we get some fruits at the same time.

Bex:
Kiwi fruits, wonderful! In the past you used to grow different things here. What else have you grown here?

Vince:
Yes, everything, potatoes, everything before. All veggies.

Bex:
Cauliflower?

Vince:
Yes, cauliflower in the winter not in summer.

Bex:
Some cauliflower comes here in the winter.. and?

Vince:
Basil, all the herbs I can grow.

Bex:
So we found you, Vince, at the farmer’s market in Frenchs Forest here in Sydney and we buy a vast majority of our own vegetables from you.

Vince:
I’ve got a brother in law, we work all together with the same stuff.  We don’t use chemicals.

Bex:
Ok.

Vince:
He’s a little bit older than me and we share the stuff. Whatever he grows, he sends to me and I pay the market price whatever it is.

Bex:
Where is his farm?

Vince:
(The Farm) is up in Dural (West of Sydney, about 50 min)

Bex:
In Dural. So you put together what you’ve grown here and what he’s grown there to sell in the farmer’s market.

Vince:
At the elementary school here (across the road), most of the people know me. They take their kids to school, then they come up to the market.

Bex:
Wonderful!

Vince:
We had the shop for 17 years in Collaroy Plateau. I know a few people from there that still come and see me. I don’t know what I’ve got, but they are still coming!

Bex:
The benefits, obviously, from buying from a local farmer such as yourself is that you grow here, not certified (certified organic), but in an organic fashion.

Vince:
We don’t have an organic certificate because it’s too late for me to do one.  There’s a lot of money involved. They have to check the ground, too much to do. I can’t keep up with it.

I have found at the Bunnings (Sydney hardware and gardening chain store) a kind of spray. You put it in a bottle, place a couple of holes, the fruit flies go in and die in there. Caterpillars, I can’t do nothing with caterpillars.

Bex:
So instead of spraying anything on the plants, you just put it in the bottle and attract things (flies) in there.

Vince:
Yes, they are trapped in there and never come out to touch the fruit, plant or anything.

Bex:
Fantastic! What other methods do you use to nourish the soil and the plants? Growing in between? Or putting some fertilizer?

Note: He does hang fake snakes to scare away birds and pests too.

Cheap Organic Fruits and Vegetables Grown in Your-city City
Vince uses fake snakes to scare birds and other pests

Vince:
I put “Dynamic Lifter”. Organic stuff.  Special from the markets. It’s a special fertilizer for growth.

If you want you can check if any people suspect something.

…and I use lime. I leave it in the ground for 6 months sometimes with nothing growing in it. Then I change the piece of the land.

Bex:
Do you use any other organic fertilizer or you put something in between the crops?

Vince:
I put a lot of compost. Dead grass. Sometimes I’ll buy some compost, organic from the nursery, if I need it. They don’t suffer.

Cheap Organic Fruits and Vegetables Grown in Your City
Vince purposely plants other plants in between his crops to help nourish the soil

Bex:
You find that’ll keep your soil nourished enough to keep your crops growing.

Vince: (Vince agrees and nods.) Yes. Sometimes I get a tomato plant about 5 feet high.

Bex: Because of the volume, the amount of the crops you are growing in here, you think this is a sustainable way?

Vince:
I do lose some crops. I get enough benefit for what I save. I prefer to have a worm rather than a chemical.

Bex:
You prefer to have a worm rather than a chemical.

(Bex continues… now talking about the 12 avocados trees. Missed the first part)

They (avocado trees) are actually growing between his wall that’s around his house and the footpath, or sidewalk. So you can really grow food anywhere.

Would you say to our viewers that anybody with a little bit of backyard, a little bit of grass and a little bit of land on the side of their house can do a bit of what you do?

Vince:
If people like me want to grow stuff, they’ve got to prepare the ground with a bit of lime to cultivate, leave it to rest for a while,  and you can grow anything you want to grow.

Bex:
Vince, thank you so much for talking to us today and inspiring us. We want to let everyone know that if you are in the Sydney area, you can visit Vince at the farmers market. At Frenchs Forest Farmer’s Market, every Sunday morning from 8 am to 1 pm.

“Vince’s Veggies” is the name of his stall. You look for him and his grandson, Simon. You can also find him on Facebook, thanks to his grandson: www.facebook.com/Vincesveggies

‘From our familia to yours’

This is really the way we should be shopping, growing our food as a community. Thank you Vince, very much!

Are Free Range Organic Eggs Worth the Money?

Are Free Range Organic Eggs Worth the Extra Money?

Note:  ‘Are Freerange Organic Eggs Worth the Money?’ – This is a transcription of the video.

Brad:
Hey guys! Welcome to Primal Health, It’s Brad here. Today I am at Clarendon Farms in Pitt Town, west of Sydney about 90 minutes, with Ian Littleton who is the owner here. We thought we’d come down and let him help explain to us what is the difference between Free Range, Free Roaming, Organic and Certified Organic Eggs. What the difference is and basically what makes his business unique from other farms.

So, Ian can you tell us the difference first up between those different certifications and what they actually mean?

Ian [01:09]:
The term ‘Free Range’ can cover quite intense operations. So at the moment there is no real limit on the stocking rate that the birds are allowed to roam on in the range area. Also there is currently a proposal on by the Australian Egg Corporation to actually have a very heavy stocking rate of around 20,000 birds per hectare (2.5 acres), which is way above what we do here, and still described as free range. The other things are with those systems often the birds are locked in the cages until about midday in the belief that they have to do that so the birds will lay in the nest boxes in the shed. Also, they tend to raise the birds in ‘pullet rearing’ systems which are designed not only for free range but also for cage systems and barns systems where such young birds are confined in houses up until the point of lay. So that’s something else that true free range farmers find abhorrent, because it means that when the birds are let out during the laying period, they’re just not used to the idea of going outdoors.

[nonmember]FREE YOU TUBE VIDEO – Duration: 2:27min


MEMBER VIDEO: Duration: 8.28min

View the entire member video below when logged in.
No login details? Join the Tribe! (top right of this page)
[/nonmember]
[wlm_loginform]
[private_FREE]
[jwplayer config=”primal-health-600w-player” mediaid=”3651″]
[/private_FREE]

Brad [2:15]:
What is free roaming?

Ian:
Well, the free roaming is another definition of the free range. There are the people who are concerned about the corruption or the over-intensification of the current description of free range, and so they have been using the terms open range, free range and pasture-raised birds as a way of trying to differentiate their system away from the idea of intensive free range.

Brad:
What is the difference between Organic Vs Certified Organic?

Ian:
There shouldn’t be any difference, if someone is calling their product organic, it should be certified. This is one area where legislation applies. To describe a product organic, it should have gone through a certification process. So it is important when you are looking at the product that is described as Organic to check for the certification logo displayed on the product and also certification number of the farm as well.

Brad [3:20]:
You are certified by the A.C.O here in Australia. There are lots of certifying agencies in the USA, how many are here in Australia?

Ian:
…A.C.O. for short. It is a privately run body and there are actually seven in Australia. A.C.O. is the one of two major ones and the vast majority of the organic farms in Australia are certified by Australian Certified Organic or N.A.A.S.A. But also in Australia, the actual performance of those certifying bodies is monitored by the Federal Department of Primary Industries as we do export the organic products and this is important for the Australian government that the produce are genuinely meeting requirements.

Brad [4:02]:
Why do you feel the free range organic system you use here, produce superior eggs?

Ian:
We do actually get complimented a lot on our eggs by our consumers. I’ll have to be honest, one of the big things that sets our eggs apart, is the fact that we do our own distribution. We actually get out our eggs into the marketplace in a very fresh condition. In fact, we are delivering eggs into the Sydney market every day. So basically, the eggs are picked up in the morning, graded and sometimes they can be in Sydney in the afternoon. This is one of the advantages of the small farms like this where we can do that. We don’t have farms way out in Queensland or Western New South Wales, shipping eggs into a central distribution centre then going off to another warehouse. So, that’s one of things about what we do. The other thing is the way our birds are managed, we do get a lower production level from our birds, they are not pushed as hard as what birds in the cage system or barn system may be. We don’t use artificial lighting, so in a sense you could say that the nutrients the birds take up are spread over a a smaller number of eggs. So this has an impact on the quality of the eggs as well.

Brad [5:14]:
What are the living conditions like for the chooks?

Are Free Range Organic Eggs Worth the Extra Money?
Here’s one of Ian’s sheds on wheels that allows them to replenish the pasture more effectively.

Ian:
We use portable houses and these houses here are mounted on wheels. We actually move the houses over the pasture area. So when the pasture gets knocked back like you can see here, then we simply move the houses up the pasture and then it rejuvenates the area that’s left behind. The houses are just roosting, nesting houses. They provide ample shade, nest boxes for the birds during the day and a roosting area for the birds at night. The birds are not confined in these houses, at any time, they can just come and go.

Brad:
They can sleep out here if they want to?

Ian:
Yes, they can but the bird’s natural tendency is to actually roost at night and get up off the ground. We can do this because we protect them against the predators. We have the entire range area surrounded by quite an elaborate electric fencing system and we have Flock Guardian Dogs that roam around inside the area. Now the dogs, the way that they work, they simply just send a message out to predators saying don’t come in! So there’s a whole lot less incentive for a fox to come through the fence. This means the birds just do whatever they like.

Brad [6:20]:
Foxes seems to be the number one predator for chooks?

Ian:
Yes, particularly in this area here. We are here on the urban fringe which means that we have very high fox population around here. We have a resident fox population here of around 8 foxes per hectare which is actually quite high.

Brad [6:40]:
What does a happy chook eat here?

Ian [7:04]:
The Cris Valgang certification – we can only feed them food which is also Organically Certified. So we buy grains and protein meals which is blended into feed mix…. They do also get some nutrition from the pasture but not very much from the pasture the way it is at the moment because it’s so dry.

Brad:
Is wheat the grain of choice for the chooks?

Ian:
Yes, it is with Certified Organic Farms but with most Poultry farms as well.

[Brad Note: it’s very rare that you will find chickens not fed grains in a commercial setting.]

Brad:
Also, because the pasture isn’t actually sprayed with fungicide or pesticides, that will also count towards the certified Organic Certification, correct?

Ian:
Yes, that’s right. The whole management of the farm comes under the audit process. We certainly cannot use any chemicals, weedicides or any sort of medications within our system and that’s what we are checked on each year.

Brad [7:40]:
Why do chooks get their beaks trimmed on mainstream farms?

Ian:
Well the reason why beak trimming is used throughout the poultry industry and particularly now with these intensive free range systems that are promoted at the moment, the birds are crowded in so much, there is a big social pressure on the birds that they do become aggressive trying to maintain their place.

Brad [8:00]:
Well there you have it. Thank you very much Ian, for giving your time today. We really learned quite a lot coming out here. So that’s the difference guys, that’s why you pay an extra few dollars per dozen eggs when you go to a farmers market or an organic store or something like that to buy eggs. It really is worth the extra money. Thanks very much Ian, for your time.

COMMENT: Does this video make you want to source better quality eggs from naturally raised chickens? Why or why not?

Slow Cooked Lamb Shanks

Primal Recipes - Slow Cooked Lamb Shanks

Note: ‘Slow Cooked Lamb Shanks’- This is a video transcription.

Bex:
Hi! I’m going to make lamb shanks this morning because it’s a busy day and I want to have a beautiful dinner tonight. But I’m not going to be home later to cook it so I’m going to get it going here now and let my slow cooker to do all the work while I’m gone all day. I’m going to show you how quick and fast it is to do everything, before you even take off for the day.

[nonmember]FREE YOU TUBE VIDEO – Duration: 2:17min

>

MEMBER VIDEO: Duration: 14.29min

View the entire member video below when logged in.
No login details? Join the Tribe! (top right of this page)
[/nonmember]
[wlm_loginform]
[private_FREE]
[jwplayer config=”primal-health-600w-player” mediaid=”2990″]
[/private_FREE]

Take out your slow cooker. Anytime you’re going to cook meat you also want to let the meat sit out a little bit so it gets more to room temperature and cooks more evenly. So, I took out my lamb shanks before we had breakfast and I’m going to take my big pan and get them browning. I take coconut oil which is my favorite high heat oil and I am going to brown the shanks so I need medium to high heat.

 

While that’s heating up, I’m going to think what else I will have with my lamb shanks. I am going to have carrots, onions, and some garlic cloves. While the pan is heating, I will start chopping things up. So, because everything is going in the slow cooker and gets nice and melded together, you can really be random about how you cut it, it is really up to you. You can have big chunks of onions, you can have tiny little chunks, depends on if you want thin sauce or chunky sauce. Lamb shanks always come out delicious. It’s a beautiful cut of meat, it has plenty of fat to make the sauce tasty, so you can really play around with the sauce. I am going to show you basic way that I have been doing them. It’s a little bit of tomato paste, a little bit of tomato puree, some dried herbs, nothing fancy. Because that way anytime you want to cook some shanks, you usually have all the ingredients on hand. But once you get down the basics, then you can try out some different shank recipes, some orange peel, red wine is always good. You can use stock or water…you don’t have to be fancy, it’s all up to you. This really is all about just getting food cooking, so that you have a nice dinner when you come home. It’s really more about convenience and having healthy food when you don’t have a lot of time for preparation.

 

So I have done my onions quite small like that, just diced them up, and I am going to dice up some carrots now. You notice my carrots are all funky looking – this is a really good way to get cheap, organic carrots. They are certified organic but I bought them as juicing carrots because they are not pretty. They are all the pieces that came out funny looking. People like pretty food so the not pretty ones are really cheap. So I bought my juicing carrots because I’m going to chop them up anyway, It doesn’t matter what they look like. I am doing them fairly small this time. I do them kind of cut in half and then do some half moons. That way it’s just going to go in with the sauce.

 

I think my pan is going to be nice and hot now so I am going to check it. Go like that to get the oil around. You can kinda see when it is getting hot, but sometimes I just go like this (sprinkle some water). It is hot. Throw my shanks on. Look at that, nice big pan so you can get six shanks in there all at once. I’m going to get my insert from the slow cooker and put it over here so when the shanks are ready, they’ll go straight in.

 

I’ll finish my chopping, will do lots of carrots. You can make carrots the main veggie inside the slow cooker with the shanks or you can dice them up really small and make them part of the sauce. All this can be done while the little one is drawing and playing over there on her table. This is one of Kaiya’s favourite meals. Nice and messy, kids love it, they can pick up the bones and eat the meat; suck the marrow out of the bottom of the bone. I have got my carrot and my onions, and I’m going to do a few little garlic cloves. I cut the ends off the garlic and then I press the knife on top of the garlic, give it a little push and then the skin comes off much easier. Garlic and rosemary are always well paired with lamb so I like to put lots of garlic. Ok, I am going to check on my shanks. Get my tongs, give them a twist. Yep, they’re getting nice and brown.

 

Most people picture shanks on top of a big bed of mash potato, I happen to love that as well. So yeah, you can serve your lamb shanks on a bed of mash potato, or you can serve them Mediterranean style with some couscous. Or if you don’t want to have any starch or any grains, you can just serve them as is, and you can make your sauce more full of vegetables. Another good veggie that goes well with this would be celery. Celery breaks down beautifully in the slow cooker. Recently we actually even had our lamb shanks on a bed of spinach, didn’t even cook it (the spinach). Put a big bed of baby spinach and then popped the lamb shanks on top, poured the sauce over and it looked beautiful.

 

Primal Recipes - Slow Cooked Lamb Shanks
Primal Recipes – Slow Cooked Lamb Shanks

 

Now, with slow cookers, browning your meat beforehand is optional. It is an extra step, it does take extra time. I like to do it with shanks in particular, as it doesn’t take as long as when you have diced meat, and gives it some extra colour and flavor. Now my shanks are looking nice and brown, I am going to put them in the slow cooker. I got a nice big slow cooker so can fit six shanks in here. We are a family of three but I always make at least double so we have a lot of leftovers. Take that (pan) off the heat for a second while I try to get my shanks in. I don’t want it (the oil) to be too hot that it starts smoking, so that will cool it down a little bit.

 

Now we’re going to throw all this stuff on. I am going to throw the onion on first. I’ve still got plenty of  coconut oil, plus the grease from the lamb which gives it a really a nice flavor. Onions are getting nice and brown, it only takes a couple minutes. I will throw the garlic on now and all the carrots on top. With the carrots you can do them with the sauce, like I am doing now, or you can just throw them in (slow cooker) on top later. But this way the carrots get mixed in with the herbs and sauce, so just let it pick up all the beautiful brown bits of the lamb from the bottom of the pan. Then I grab some of my herbs from my cabinet, some thyme and rosemary. You can use fresh herbs or dried herbs or a combination of the two. All depends on what you have on hand at the time, and will prevent you from saying that you can’t make the recipe because you don’t have the right ingredients. You can just “wing it”, as long as you have the basic idea.

 

Now, I like tomato passata, as it comes in a jar instead of a can, and it’s just basically a tomato puree. And organic concentrated tomato paste gives a really good thick texture. Two heaping tablespoons does it for the tomato paste and then add the passata, which is nice and runny so pour it on generously. Again I’m not really measuring here; I just kind of pour it on until I can see that I can cook my veggies in it. So I’ve coated the onion, garlic, carrots and herbs with my tomato paste and tomato puree and I am going to let the heat go a bit high to let the flavors meld together. It’s quite thick so I just get a tiny bit of filtered water and pour that on. You can be the judge of your own sauce thickness. I let it come to a bit of a boil and now simmer. Let it simmer for five to ten minutes; really depends on how much time you have. Once it’s ready just pick it up (the pan) and pour it on top of our shanks.

 

Put it (the slow cooker) on low so it can cook all day long. You can really keep your shanks in there for eight to ten hours and not worry if you’re going to be home late from work. It will be beautiful when you get home. It’s done and literally, look what I have to clean up – hardly any dishes, just my pan and a chopping board and I will have a beautiful dinner when I get home.

 

Like I said, if you want to have some potato with it, or some sweet potato, you can really just chop them in half and throw them on top, and when you get home, that can be your base.­­­
“Shanks” for watching!

 

Primal Kids – Real Food for Growing Bodies!

Primal Kids Food | Paleo Kids Food

Long before I was a mother, I started watching kids eat. As a cafe waitress, I would cringe while serving family meals. For the parents: grilled chicken, steak or fish with salad or vegetables. For the kids: chips (french fries), a milkshake and maybe some chicken nuggets or a mini pizza. The kids food came frozen in a box with ingredients like hydrolyzed vegetable protein, thickeners, stabilizers, artificial flavours (like MSG) and colours, preservatives of every number, hydrogenated vegetable oils, refined flours, and maybe a bit of chicken scraps. Many of the kids knew better than to eat it. Their instincts kicked in and they would whine while the parents tried to co-erce their “picky eaters” into finishing the so-called food. Parents have somehow became convinced that kids won’t eat the same nutritious food as adults, but we’re here with Kaiya to debunk that myth and save your kids from “kid food”.

Primal Kids Food | Paleo Kids Food
Kids instinctively love real food!

In this video, Kaiya is 2 1/2  to just over 3 years old. Most adults are absolutely amazed by what Kaiya eats, as if she’s some alien child because she likes the same food that her parents do. But this food is simply all Kaiya knows, and all she has ever eaten her whole life. We are not wonder parents or health food nazis; we just serve Kaiya the same nutritious foods that we eat.

At 3 years and 2 months, Kaiya loves sweet potato, eggplant, red capsicum (bell pepper), beetroot (beets), green beans, tomatoes, brussel sprouts, broccoli, cauliflower, pumpkin, carrot, onion, garlic, sauerkraut, cabbage, cooked spinach, veggie juice, kale chips, rice, liver pate, nuts, fruit, chicken, fish, lamb, pork and beef. She does not like zucchini, asparagus, raw spinach, or cucumber. Besides those in the video, other meals she eats with us regularly are mild curries, osso bucco, liver and onions, pork belly roast with crackling, stir-fries, homemade soups, meatloaf, lamb shanks, and raw grated veg salads.

How to Get Your Kids Eating Primal Foods

Watch Primal Baby – Baby Led Weaning – No More Mashed Up Food or Separate Meals
Read 10 Ways to Kids Who Eat Healthier Than You
And get primal yourself, so you can be the best example for your kids!

Primal Baby – Baby Led Weaning – No More Mashed-Up Food!

Primal Baby Food | Paleo Baby Food

Note: ‘Primal Baby – Baby Led Weaning – No more mashed up food or separate meals!’ – This is a transcription of the video.

What is a Primal Baby?

Brad:
This is our daughter Kaiya. She just turned one year of age and this is the first in the series of videos we are doing on the Primal Baby / Kids. We are going to show you how we have been feeding her since the age of six months on whole foods and also want to show you this book “Baby-led Weaning” which we found to be really helpful for getting babies from breast feeding to the combination of breast feeding and eating solids. I will hand you over to my wife now (Bex) who will give you a bit more of the specifics about how we prepare her eating area, what sort of things she eats, and then there will be another video showing you like, a day in the life of, what she does actually eat.

Bex:
Before we eat, we spray Kaiya’s eating surface with plain white vinegar in a spray bottle, or pro-biotic spray…this is putting good bacteria on the surface, not ant-bacterial but pro-biotic. Then that way she can eat off the surface and throw her food around. Then we also put a plastic mat down on the floor underneath the chair, so if she drops food or if she throws food we can just put it back up on the table and she can continue to play and eat.

Kaiya’s meals are just as the same as ours. She has a wide variety of foods. The food is not puréed or mashed up. It’s served to her in smaller bits so she can hold on to it with her little hands. This type of feeding, not spoon-feeding and not mashing up the food, serves several purposes.

Primal Baby Food | Paleo Baby Food
Primal Baby – Kaiya was breast fed for 2 years and fed real solid food from the age of 6 months.

1/ It makes her very dexterous, as you can see she gets very good with her hands. She can pick up little tiny peas with her fingers, and she can hold large chicken drumsticks with her hands.

2/ She learns what food is, what it looks like, what it smells like, what the textures are like and she learns about all the different types of foods.

3/ She learns how far she can put food into her mouth. Babies’ gag reflexes are further forward than adults, so if they have a chance to learn how to move food around in their mouth, they can discover how far back they can go without choking. When she first started eating, she would gag up the food sometimes, but after a couple of weeks she stopped doing that, as she learned how far she can put the food.

4/ Lastly, but not least important, she learns how to chew. So rather than having food that’s all soupy and mashed she has real textures and she learns how to chew her food which is an important part of digestion.

For the following-up video, watch Primal Kids – Real Food for Growing Bodies!

Recommended Purchases

Baby Led Weaning  BioPure Probiotic Household Cleaning Concentrate MiEnviron 250ml bottle and trigger spray
Amazon.com
Fishpond.com.au
Book Depository.com
BioPure Probiotic Household
Cleaning Concentrate
MiEnviron 250ml Bottle and
Trigger Spray