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Exercising with Disabilities

Do you have a million and one excuses each week as to why you DON’T move your body with purpose? Do you need some inspiration? Between January and September of 2002, I had the pleasure of training 3 school terms of a group of 4-9 different people each week that attended the Northwest Disability School in Baulkham Hills, Sydney, Australia. I learnt so much about disabilities and found it a great challenge to create programs for groups of guys and girls that had a range of mental and physical disabilities. I took the approach of expecting each person to be able to do everything I asked of them, until proven otherwise. Until I knew each person individually, I didn’t know what they were capable of. So there was no point stereotyping them that they couldn’t run, jump, kick, hop and even lift weights. It was great to see how much fun they had with it, and even better to see some of their body shapes change too!

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Words from Tamara Nol (former client and mother of client with Hemiplegia):
“We were introduced to Brad by a friend, because he had the most experience dealing with issues concerning people with disabilities. I joined the gym where Brad worked mainly because of my daughter, as she has hemiplegia (one side of the body not working properly) as a result of a sickness, but the benefits we have received since we have had Brad as our coach have been tremendous. My daughter now walks much better than before and her posture has changed considerably. I myself have become more fit and toned and as a bonus we have both also learnt about the importance of eating healthier and choosing our foods more wisely. I would strongly recommend working with Brad to anyone, as he not only understands the human body in its essence, but he is also a great motivator!”

Exercising with a Disability | Personal Training for the Disabled | Hemiplegia

Renata Nol doing a standing cable pull. Her right side is affected by hemiplegia. I would velcro her hand to the cable to help grap the handle, so she could then utilise her back muscles more.

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